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down on what n.s.a. is doing? >> well, the grehing is we live a democracy. if we don't like what n.s.a. is doing we can get rid of the government and put in a different government. i think -- actually we've been collecting this information for so long, and long before n.s.a. was collecting it. let me tell you who was collecting it: american express, visa, all of your credit card data we have -- all of your financial records. this whole issue of privacy is utterly fascinating to me. for example, we could do a much better job in the whole new area of privacy which is medical records. >> rose: right. >> if we could take our medical records and put them in a database we could then figure out what drugs worked for what people. so we take all the medical records then all the gino mick data about the people and we put in the a database and figure out what therapies they're getting, what therapies work and don't work because there's this big database where you should take lipitor, you should take crestor. it could be very scientific. we could do a draw dramatically better job of treating peopl
like three-letter acronyms, n.s.a.'s current p.r. problem notwithstanding. h.v.f. stands for hard, valuable fun. those are the three necessary conditions for me to get out of bed and go to work. hard. it's no fun solving problems that are easy. somebody's already doing it. it's not defensible. it's not that exciting so to solve not a hard problem so it has to be difficult to do. hard. valueable? it better make the world a bert place. bang your head against the wall, you might break the wall or break the head, it's not helping anybody. valuable means impacting the world for the better. you have to be passionate about it. i've done a few things in my life that i felt deeply about and didn't care and some things that i didn't say t care that much and fun is the short hand for whatever hard problem i solve, i have to ultimately care about. so hard, valuable, fun. >> there's things you read about you don't sleep much at one time. >> i don't sleep much. >> rose: is it -- what is it? three to five hours? >> i think i average four and a half these days. >> well, that's three to five. how
of information he has about american intelligence about the n.s.a. for their own good. that would be acting they might consider in their own national interest. so are they doing that giving him everything he knows? >> and you can ask the same question about the chinese when he was in hong kong. >> rose: what do you assume? >> i would assume that their intelligence services would be delinquent in their duty if they didn't make every effort to do that. i don't know the answer. >> rose: i talked to a former c.i.a. person and said would we be doing that if we had the opportunity? of course. >> his father says it hasn't happened. i don't know. i don't know. >> rose: okay, what about syria? is -- where do you think -- where do you think the effort to put together some kind of -- and the united states desperately wants and john kerry desperately wants russian cooperation to figure out a way to stop syria from becoming a stalemate and a civil war that just goes on and on and on. >> rose: and putin wants it, too. so you would think that would be enough to act on. here's the conflict no story began y
's not slow. >> no, it's been nasdaq, nsa, anthony weiner, incredibly ridiculous. >> rose: the gift that keeps giving. >> that's right, which cannot not give. >> rose: yes. >> but there were momentsment like two shows in particular, a pretty hard to navigate when it's feelings of complete despair. the trayvon martin verdict i felt personally very, you know, it's very difficult. there's a lot of emotion. and even more so i felt that was the first time i really felt john's absence. >> we the jury find george zimmerman not guilty. >> holy fuuch. so he's innocent 1234 wait, what? how could that possible-- you-- you have got to be-- there's no-- i can't even-- oh my god! (laughter) which i guess is what we'll call tonight's segment. (laughter) because that feels about right. that feels in your heart about right. the audience often looked to jon to make them, to help them articulate very complicated, painful feelings. and something like the trayvon martin verdict would be a moment where i could feel in the audience people are looking to jon. they're not looking to me. what they want is jon. so i fel
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4

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